GET FRESH WITH ME: Food Documentary Screening + Discussion

Today is the FIRST day of the new Farmers Market at SteelStacks on Southside Bethlehem! If you’re not feeling sure about going, let me just say this:

Among the vendors listed is Balasia. Bam. See you there, yes?

 Also: an organic and fair trade coffee and tea vendor, Easton Salsa Company (how can a condiment be so good!?), several other vendors offering vegan goods, produce and vegetable plants, and a winery (hey now!) to name a few.

It’s from 3pm-7pm. 

BUT WAIT, THERE’S MORE! 

Inside Steelstacks cinema is the screening of Fresh, a food documentary about the contamination of food and agriculture, of how it became “profit over people”, how spraying chemicals on everything and  violently abusing animals became standard. Beyond the grim veil of all the things we’ve done to make such a mess, the film shows real life examples of people that have followed a new way (perhaps, more accurately, an old way) of doing things that doesn’t devastate the earth, animals, crops or people.

The film begins at 7:30pm, cost is $9.50 and there is a student discount. Discussion panelists include:  Dr. Megan Grega, the Chief Medical Officer and co-founder of the Kellyn Foundation, Brian Moyer, Scott Meyer.

 Scott Meyer is the author of a really neat book that, incidentally, I was just looking at two weeks ago without realizing we’d get to talk to him. The City Homesteader covers all essentials of urban farming and gardening, including DIY money saving (and earth saving) tips, and the book has a beautiful design. *It does contain non-vegan info like how to raise chickens and such, but you’re all adults and can decide what info is pertinent or not.

 SEE YOU THERE!

One thought on “GET FRESH WITH ME: Food Documentary Screening + Discussion

  1. I believe farmer’s markets and small scale natural farming is the main answer to rebuilding our country, and re-establishing it as the place to be. We can only HELP our country by supporting local farmers, and if catastrophe happens, we will have good local sources of healthy foods at our disposal to get us through trying times.

    One thing in the traailer though seems out of place. A man said, “we are trying to figure out how to grow more food on less space”, but French bio-intensive gardening was all the rage in the seventies, and now has been superseded by permaculture, so for the most part this has been achieved.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s